Tips

 Basil Pesto Sauce 


Traditionally, pesto sauce is made with fresh basil leaves. Now a day; Pesto’s meaning has expanded to grab any preparation involving a puree of some leafy green ingredient along with garlic, olive oil, nuts, and cheese but is going to make a very classic and traditional pesto with basil leaves. So, now I am going to collect my basil leaves from my garden and collect all the ingredients you can also join me.

 

Basil Pesto Sauce

Basil Pesto Sauce

Ingredients:

  • Fresh basil leaves – 2 cups 
  • Pine nuts (or walnuts) – ½ cup 
  • Peanut (optional) – ¼ cup
  • Olive oil – ½ cup
  • Garlic – 3 cloves
  • Freshly grated hard cheese (Parmigiano-Reggiano/ Pecorino-Romano cheese) – ¾ cup
  • Salt – as per the to taste

Combine all the ingredients in a blender except the oil and cheeses. Blend until the pesto is a slightly rough or fine paste. Usually, I make fine paste because of my parents’ choice. It is entirely as per your needs. Now mix the paste in a bowl and mix with oil and cheeses.​

To serve basil pesto with pasta, you can toss the cooked pasta directly with the pesto. If you want little watery pesto sauce then add a spoonful or two of the hot pasta water to the pesto, then toss well with the cooked pasta and serve right away.

Note:

  • You can combine any sort of greens as an alternative of the basil like parsley, cilantro, kale, spinach, mint, arugula, etc.
  • Walnuts are exactly cheap substituted for the pine nuts, but you can also use cashews, pistachios, almonds, or even pumpkin seeds (hulls removed). 
  • As for the cheese, it’s best to use a hard cheese such as Parmigiano-Reggiano, Pecorino Romano, that can be difficult to find. Alternatively, experiment with other aged hard cheeses (sometimes referred to as “grating cheeses”). 
  • The best way to store pesto for a long in the freeze an excellent method is to fill ice cube trays, freeze it, later store it into a Ziplock bag so, which you can use them whenever you want.

Tip:

  • Extra-virgin olive oil contains generous amounts of polyphenols (compared with other oils) content if you blend it more becomes bitterer. Another solution is to use pure olive oil instead of extra-virgin olive oil, or you can use any other vegetable oil but the point is your pesto will become a little mild.
  • If you want more diluted pesto than add little more Olive Oil and if you want little more concentrated for a dip or spread use less oil and it’ll be thicker.

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